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How The Bible Is Both For You And Written To You
  • augustine1

    St. Augustine’s Institute for Biblical Hermeneutics (Part I)

    The Bible bursts the bonds of our hermeneutical strategies. The Scriptures as the medium of divine communication are what Karl Barth called a “free Bible”. This is good news: the canon imposes itself upon us readers, transgressing the procrustean bed we inevitably bring to the table as interpreters. For...
  • Getting the Most out of Your Bible: Gaining Insights from Genre

    Sound hermeneutics requires an understanding of how communication works. The Bible, after all, is God’s authoritative communication to us. There are three components of communication: words, genre, and message. “Words” refers to what we say; “genre” to the way we say it; and “message” to the reason for saying...
  • Paul, the Gladiator Apostle?

    As fun as flannel-gram Bible stories were, I always found it frustrating (especially when trying to teach with them) that so often, you are short the people and the objects necessary to tell the entire story. Sometimes you just don’t have enough Galilean common folk to make two crowds,...
  • Hermeneutics of Love (Guest Post)

    Withstanding the apostles and Jesus himself, Saint Aurelius Augustine is arguably the greatest Christian theologian of the first millennium.  His contributions to the understanding and development of Bible interpretation are incalculable.  He was a man ahead of his time.  Indeed many of the current debates on hermeneutics and postmodern...
  • Come, Let Us Go Out into the Wilderness

    The more I read Hebrews, the more I am convinced that Auctor wanted his readers to see themselves as members with OT Israel in their wilderness journeys. I often wonder why Hebrews includes discussion about angels, Moses, the high priest, sacrifices, the tabernacle, and other OT images; but lately I...
  • Chalcedonian Hermeneutics

    As orthodox Christians we all readily affirm the Chalcedonian Definition of Christology.  Jesus the Messiah has two natures; being both completely human and completely divine.  These two natures are distinct from each other, yet are united in the single person of Christ.  All Christological heresies abandon at least one...

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